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Late summer trip in Norway

The summer is coming to end here in Norway and the fall season started with a bang. We went for a weekends fishing trip to a lake in Østfold. The lake was very nice and so was the weather. The conditions were fantastic and we managed to trick a few fish to our flies. Not as many as we´d liked, but it was good enough for a healthy breakfast.

Konstanse went for mushrooms and quickly filled her basket.

 

 

Sunday morning was picture perfect so we used this opportunity to take a few pics of the new love – the Lawson Hammock. We heard from many that they are afraid to fall out of a hammock or even have experienced this with standard hammocks, we (as in me and myself) decided that Konstanse should try to turn the hammock upside down.

See for yourself what happened. Here´s a short video clip on how to roll back and even sleep on your side.

 

You find the Lawson Blue Ridge Hammock and the LightSaver by PowerFilmSolar in our shop.

 

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Lawson hammock tenting on Sommarøy

Maybe that was the furthest north such a tent has come so far? 69°38’5″N, 18°0’46″E – I used the Lawson Blue Ridge Hammock during my last 6 week travel in northern Norway and Sweden. Simply fantastic. It normally is hung between trees. However, some places did not have trees like this spot on Sommarøya (summer island) north of Tromsø. Not a problem. I used it like a normal tent than. – Check http://shop.tzflyfishing.no/ for more information and ordering. #motorcycle#motorcycles #bikelife #instabike#motorbike #photooftheday#instamotogallery #bmw #bmwmotorrad#norway #scandinavia #freedom #nofilter#travel #traveling #GSA #GSAdventure#makelifearide

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Danish Fly Festival – Kolding, 4. & 5. March 2017

Look forward to a weekend in the sign of fly fishing, when Northern Europe’s largest flue festival opens its doors. The many exhibitors and dedicated fly fishermen who you can meet at The Danish Fly Festival, will all make your two days in Kolding is unforgettable. There can be traded, exchanged experiences, listening to interesting lectures, experienced world class fly casters, testing equipment and not least meeting old and new fish friends.

Flycasters

By the indoor casting pool in hall 2 you will find casting instructors from Denmark and abroad who demonstrate fly casting techniques, special casts and their abilities with one and two handed fly rods. The fly casting instructors are looking forward to meeting you by the indoor casting pool and are happy to answer questions and come with tips and ideas on how you get the most out of your fly casting.
Here is who you can find at the fly casting pool:
Antti Guttorm Finland, Charles Jardine England, Kenny Frost Denmark, Morten Jarldstad Olesen Denmark, René Gerken Denmark, Thomas Gundersen Thaarup Denmark, Tomas Strandgren Sweden, William van der VorstHolland

Flytiers

In the centre of hall 1, you find the fly tying island, where fly tiers will demonstrate their techniques, exiting use of materials and demonstrate their skills at the fly tying vice. The fly tiers are looking forward to meet the festival participants who visit the fly tying island, for inspiration, advice and ideas for their own fly tying, and if you want the original fly, then many of the fly tiers are willing to sell you one of these creations.

Here is who you can find on the fly tying island:The every flydresser (;-) has 2 half days.
This is very nice as one also has time to look around. If you want to plan coming by, here is the schedule:Flytyer,
Country, Saturday, Sunday
Martin Jørgensen, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Bent Mathiesen, Norge, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Sean Stanton, Skotland. 10:00 – 13:30, 10:00 – 13:30
Sacha Pütz, Tyskland, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Dennis Skelmose Jensen. Danmark, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Thomas Züllich, Norge, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Konstanse Larsen, Norge, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Jonas Andersson, Sverige, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Stig M. Hansen, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Kim Mäki, Sverige, 10:00 – 13:30, 10:00 – 13:30
Jonatan Ternald, Sverige, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Agne Sjöberg, Sverige, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Jesper Fohrmann, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Stuart Smith, England, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Anders Ståhl, Sverige, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Hans van Klinken, Holland, 10:00 – 13:30, 10:00 – 13:30
Rob Dings, Holland, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Jens Chr. Pilgaard, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Amalie Vinderslev Østergård Nielsen, Danmark, søn 13:30 – 17:00
John Mortensen, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Allan Kuhlmann, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Louise Nielsen, Danmark, lør 10:00 – 13:30
Andy Weiss, Tyskland, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Søren Præst, Danmark, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Bo Teut Kloster, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Rune Westphal, Danmark, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00
Michael Olesen, Danmark, 13:30 – 17:00, 13:30 – 17:00
Jens Lund Adamsen, Danmark, 13:30 – 17:00, 13:30 – 17:00
Oscar Boatfield, England, søn 10:00 – 13:30
Torben Thinggaard, Danmark, 13:30 – 17:00, 10:00 – 13:30
Charles Jardine, England, 10:00 – 13:30, 13:30 – 17:00

But it´s not only flytying of course — there is much more going on. Much more —
Network session
As a visitor at The Danish Fly Festival 2017 you can participate in one or more network sessions. The network sessions are managed by two coordinators who initiates the session with a short presentation followed by free conversation on the subject. So it is the participants who influence the sessions direction and what will be exchanged in the network.It is expected that the maximum participators will be 20-25 people. Participation will require registration prior to the meeting.

However, they have announced this being a talk in Danish, which will be very interesting, as one knows – the Danes don´t even understand each other.

– check out the documentary about the Danish language here –

 

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Happy New Year 2017!

A very interesting year, was it a good one for you?

This year has been filled with some great and some very strange events. From the Rio Olympics to Brexit, and the American Election you can’t say this year hasn’t been eventful!

For tzflyfishing.no it was a very exciting year with lots of fishing and tying. In 2016 we also implemented a webshop on our page.
However, we try to fish even more next year and hope to meet many friends by the water and around the campfire.

Stay tuned and follow tzflyfishing.no for upcoming events and news. There´s lot´s in the pipeline. Let´s make 2017 a peace- and joyful year.

Love and tight lines,

Konstanse & Thomas

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Seasons greeting to all!

A very interesting year, was it a good one for you?

This year has been filled with some great and some very strange events. From the Rio Olympics to Brexit, and the American Election you can’t say this year hasn’t been eventful!

For tzflyfishing.no it was a very exciting year with lots of fishing and tying. In 2016 we also implemented a webshop on our page.
However, we try to fish even more next year and hope to meet many friends by the water and around the campfire.

Stay tuned and follow tzflyfishing.no for upcoming events and news. There´s lot´s in the pipeline. Let´s make 2017 a peace- and joyful year.

We wish you a pleasant a peaceful holiday season.

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Leader Design

Leaders seems to be on the menu lately. I learned from my old friend Bernie – who sadly passed away this year. That he was pretty old (over 85 or so – nobody really knows) does not ease the loss.  I really miss him. He was quite a character.

Back in the days we worked on a leader which allows very precise control. The rivers Kyll and Ahr  we fished together in Germany, were small and we did not want the loop to open until the very end of the leader. Otherwise the fly ended up in the bush above – we are talking tunnel fishing here.

the video is a documentary about Bernie
… my first proper flyfishing teacher
(nevermind the clown with the microphone)

Generally speaking (in fishing-lingo that is) a leader is the piece of line between the hook and the main line. This piece of line is normally somewhat smaller in diameter than the main line. Various sorts come into play, level line monofilament for bait fishing, wire (for pike and the like), a shock leader for fishing in the sea – and the so-called tapered leader for angling with the fly.

That’s it. There’s not much more to say, is there? Well if it were all so simple you’d not be on this web site, would you?

Presenting the fly to a fish (tossing a hook with fluff around onto or in the water – in simpler language) is a rather complex affair, which should not be underestimated. So let’s look at the problem from the start, the feeding fish in a stream, Mr. fish is looking upstream, feeding. He grabs a bite whenever the big conveyer belt-like flow brings food downstream- either on the water surface or in the water body. Therefore the fish is looking upstream virtually all day.

A rather boring life. Well fish don’t know that, so… However, being in such a position for extended periods of its life imprints some very well-defined patterns in that little fish brain. For instance, the fish has never seen a mayfly with a v-wave in front like a boat, so you (the clever angler) needs to avoid this happening. Sounds simple.

Presenting a fly like that is called dead drift. OK, there are other forms, the famous running sedge or the little bait fish escaping for example, but in imitating all such behaviour one must have good control over the lure.

I guess you start to get my point. Let’s continue looking at dead drift. Drag (that tiny, tiny v-wave), is caused by a taut line. Therefore you need slack line between you and the fly. The trick is to have just enough slack in the line to avoid drift, but enough contact to hook up with fish. The flowing current does not make this any easier.
So that’s the problem in a nutshell. The more natural your presentation looks to the fish, the more you’ll catch, particularly the wild ones.

The system consisting of fly line and precisely matched rod tapers all the way to the end point. At the end of the line a leader is attached.
Casting this system is done with subtlety rather than power, as it is manoeuvered to develop a loop. This loop gains great speed, even when cast with the most minimal power. This power needs to be spent so the fly lands on the water with natural elegance. The more precisely such behaviour is mimicked, the more fish you catch.

Landing a dry fly softly also increases its tendency to float. This allows you to use sllimmer and more natural fly designs. Likewise for Nymphs, which you can drop into the water precisely where you want them. When you can control the amount of slack in the leader and tippet, a nymph can sink without being hindered by the line. The flies don’t need much or even any weight added to them.

There are tapered, furled or braided, and knotted leaders. All have pro and cons. In my opinion the knotted type is preferable for the type of fishing described above. So I looked deeply into this kind of leader.

My very first book on Fly-fishing was “A fly fisher’s life” by Charles C. Ritz – ASIN: B0007EI4CU which had some information about knotted leaders. As this was „an old“ book I smiled arrogantly and went ahead tossing hard-earned money out of the window by shopping for all these fantastic things one gets offered by the „industry“. You guess the outcome. The fishing never really worked. Through contact with some other anglers and reading more in books and the „net“ I frequently ran into advocates of the hand-tied leader.

So I searched for my first book again to look for the detailed recipes for knotted leaders. Charles C. Ritz describes three main parts of a leader.

  1. power transmission – 60% of the total leader length
  2. taper – 20% of the total leader length
  3. Tippet – 20% of the total leader length

The total length is in Ritz’ book is never really more than 2,9m. I suspect this is because of shorter and different action of the cane rods of the time.

From other sources I heard that a leader should be 1.5 times the rod length. I found others advocating a similar ratio so I applied this to the Ritz 60/20/20 system and experimented. With modern rods and lines I concluded that a leader of 1.35 times the rod length worked best for me. I tied a few for some friends as well and the reactions were all more than positive. As this system seems to work for my friends from Lapland to Nevada, that is why I am sharing it with you here.

On to the technical bit. The single pieces of monofilament line are tied together with blood knots, named after their inventor Mr. Blood. These knots are ideal as they provide a perfectly straight connection without any bends and turns. I mostly use Maxima camo for the leader and Stroft GTM for the tippet, but choice of monofilament is very much up to you. If you believe all the hype, you can even use fluorocarbon.

For the connection of taper and tippet I insert a little ring, known as leader ring. The Leader itself is connected to the fly line with a nail knot or similar. Don’t worry about having to change the whole leader often. You won’t have to.

Have fun tying the leader. It’s a little easier with using a Blood-Knot tool though.

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the long haul

The summer fishing season is in full swing up here in the “arctics”. My fly box is full and the trips planned and prepared ……. not – never enough preparation really, but what the heck.I hope you had fun the last fall, winter and spring. I hope you had a chance to fill your flyboxes. Driving abouts. It´s a long haul always here in the north. The map one normally sees is pretty distorted and the distances seem much  shorter … far from it. I am still in Norway, but about 2100km away from Oslo, where I live. Crazy. If I had driven 2100km south from Oslo I´d ended up in Africa.

So I don´t know what Paul is raving about. These distances are almost normal for Scandinavia. 🙂 My GPS looks somthing like this.

Skjermbilde 2016-07-28 kl. 02.46.38


The fly box for that trip – flies-for-norway